There was no reason to suppose that he was going under an assumed name. Why should he change his name in a country where no one knew his original one? I therefore organized my Street Arab detective corps, and sent them systematically to every cab proprietor in London until they ferreted out the man that I wanted. How well they succeeded, and how quickly I took advantage of it, are still fresh in your recollection. The murder of Stangerson was an incident which was entirely unexpected, but which could hardly in any case have been prevented. Through it, as you know, I came into possession of the pills, the existence of which I had already surmised. You see the whole thing is a chain of logical sequences without a break or flaw."

"It is wonderful!" I cried. "Your merits should be publicly recognized. You should publish an account of the case. If you won't, I will for you."

"You may do what you like, Doctor," he answered. "See here!" he continued, handing a paper over to me, "look at this!"

It was the _Echo_ for the day, and the paragraph to which he pointed was devoted to the case in question.

"The public," it said, "have lost a sensational treat through the sudden death of the man Hope, who was suspected of the murder of Mr. Enoch Drebber and of Mr. Joseph Stangerson. The details of the case will probably be never known now, though we are informed upon good authority that the crime was the result of an old standing and romantic feud, in which love and Mormonism bore a part. It seems that both the victims belonged, in their younger days, to the Latter Day Saints, and Hope, the deceased prisoner, hails also from Salt Lake City. If the case has had no other effect, it, at least, brings out in the most striking manner the efficiency of our detective police force, and will serve as a lesson to all foreigners that they will do wisely to settle their feuds at home, and not to carry them on to British soil. It is an open secret that the credit of this smart capture belongs entirely to the well-known Scotland Yard officials, Messrs. Lestrade and Gregson. The man was apprehended, it appears, in the rooms of a certain Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who has himself, as an amateur, shown some talent in the detective line, and who, with such instructors, may hope in time to attain to some degree of their skill. It is expected that a testimonial of some sort will be presented to the two officers as a fitting recognition of their services."

"Didn't I tell you so when we started?" cried Sherlock Holmes with a laugh. "That's the result of all our Study in Scarlet: to get them a testimonial!"

"Never mind," I answered, "I have all the facts in my journal, and the public shall know them. In the meantime you must make yourself contented by the consciousness of success, like the Roman miser --

"`Populus me sibilat, at mihi plaudo Ipse domi simul ac nummos contemplor in arca.'"

------------- * Heber C. Kemball, in one of his sermons, alludes to his hundred wives under this endearing epithet.

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{1} {Frontispiece, with the caption: "He examined with his glass the word upon the wall, going over every letter of it with the most minute exactness." (_Page_ 23.)} {2} {"JOHN H. WATSON, M.D.": the initial letters in the name are capitalized, the other letters in small caps. All chapter titles are in small caps. The initial words of chapters are in small caps with first letter capitalized.} {3} {"lodgings.": the period should be a comma, as in later editions.} {4} {"hoemoglobin": should be haemoglobin. The o&e are concatenated.} {5} {"221B": the B is in small caps} {6} {"THE LAURISTON GARDEN MYSTERY": the table-of-contents lists this chapter as "...GARDENS MYSTERY" -- plural, and probably more correct.} {7} {"brought."": the text has an extra double-quote mark} {8} {"individual --": illustration this page, with the caption: "As he spoke, his nimble fingers were flying here, there, and everywhere."} {9} {"manoeuvres": the o&e are concatenated.} {10} {"Patent leathers": the hyphen is missing.} {11} {"condonment": should be condonement.} {12} {"Boheme": the first "e" has a backward accent (\) above it.} {13} {"wages.": ending quote is missing.} {14} {"the first.": ending quote is missing.} {15} {"make much of...": Other editions complete this sentence with an "it." But there is a gap in the text at this point, and, given the context, it may have actually been an interjection, a dash.

A Study in Scarlet Page 60

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
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Sherlock Holmes

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Sherlock Holmes
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